Woodfibre Natural Gas Limited proposes the development and operation of a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) production, storage and marine carrier LNG transfer facility on the previous industrial Woodfibre Pulp and Paper Mill site.

A new project and a new threat to the health of Howe Sound has been announced. Metro Vancouver is considering a proposal to build a $500-million garbage incinerator on Squamish First Nation lands at Port Mellon.

The 30 day public comment period on the Draft Application Information Requirements for the Eagle Mountain Woodfibre Gas Pipeline Project commenced November 15th and continues to December 16th.    Communities around Howe Sound are in full support of a comprehensive management plan and are urging the Provincial Government to commence a planning process.   A recent article in the Squamish Chief raises some of the concerns we share about the proposed project.

Howe Sound Communities Support Planning Return of industry threatens renewal of Howe Sound’s marine ecosystem Where can you find 45 adventures so close to Vancouver?

B.C. Provincial Minister Thomson, Forests Lands and Natural Resources, responded to Future of Howe Sound Society's request for a comprehensive plan for Howe Sound.

The Future of Howe Sound Society has reviewed each of the 460 comments that were posted on the BCEAO website during the Public Comment period that ended October 19th.   Comments were from a broad range of people, the majority believing that a gravel mine in Howe Sound is wrong, and the costs  far outweigh the benefits.

For the first time in half a century, commercial fishing vessels were scooping salmon out of Howe Sound last week. Starting on Thursday (Aug. 22), the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) opened up an exploratory fishery for the area, said Herb Redekopp, DFO's chief of conservation and protection for the Lower Fraser. The goal of the three-day opening was to assess the strength of the pink salmon run travelling to the Squamish River.

On Saturday, Al Price and his partner Lily Ebrao were on Howe Sound waters when they saw what seemed like a wind surfer in trouble, about hundred meters or so off the log sorts at Watts Point.   But as they got near, they were treated to a beautiful surprise: Orca whale! “To our amazement, a dorsal fin the size of a surfer emerged gently from the water about 20 meters in front of us,” said Al Price, who operates a boat tour company called Great Lynx Tours in Squamish.

Not every marine ecosystem gets a second chance. Fewer still get ruined twice. But Howe Sound, where an environmental rebirth has been unfolding for the past eight years, may soon start to slide back toward environmental sterility.

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